Dennis D. McDonald (ddmcd@outlook.com) is an independent consultant located in Alexandria Virginia. His services and capabilities are described here. Application areas include project, program, and data management; market assessment, digital strategy, and program planning; change and content management; social media; and, technology adoption. Follow him on Google+. He also publishes on CTOvision.com and aNewDomain.

Morten Tyldum’s THE IMITATION GAME

Morten Tyldum’s THE IMITATION GAME

Movie review by Dennis D. McDonald

Occasionally a popular culture artifact comes along that reminds us that the people we revere as heroes were actually human beings.  No matter how important or significant they are they still put their pants on one leg of a time and still had to deal with the times in which they lived.

THE IMITATION GAME is an example.  The focus is Alan Turing, the 20th century intellectual icon whose importance is now for many comparable to Newton’s and Einstein’s. We get to see him in action, warts and all.  We also witness the human impacts of officially sanctioned homophobia and “red scare” fears.

The casting and production values of this movie could not be better.  We’re embedded in wartime London and Bletchley Park.  The intellectual action at play is nicely presented.  It’s necessarily oversimplified but the basic facts are true: Turing’s team did break Enigma, they did have to deal with how to prevent the Axis from catching on to them, and Ultra did seriously advance the Allies’ war effort.  Plus the groundwork was laid for computers and programming.  All true. 

But all very sad.  Turing took his life after years of persecution.  I suppose we can draw some parallels to Oppenheimer’s treatment in the U.S. 

The Imitation Game might oversimplify at times but it does represent the work of real people and that’s a good thing for modern audiences to see.

Related reading:

Movie review copyright © 2015 by Dennis D. McDonald

Alexandre Aja's HORNS

Alexandre Aja's HORNS

Hiroyuki Okiura's LETTER TO MOMO

Hiroyuki Okiura's LETTER TO MOMO