Dennis D. McDonald (ddmcd@outlook.com) is an independent consultant located in Alexandria Virginia. His services and capabilities are described here. Application areas include project, program, and data management; market assessment, digital strategy, and program planning; change and content management; social media; and, technology adoption. Follow him on Google+. He also publishes on CTOvision.com and aNewDomain.

Polygon Pictures' BLAME!

Polygon Pictures' BLAME!

Review by Dennis D. McDonald

What sets this Netflix-streaming anime apart from other dystopian – cyberpunk – action films is the visual style.

The story itself -- a lone wolf stranger helps a ragtag group of human survivors against seemingly insurmountable machine-based extermination -- is by now old hat. But the execution, visually and design wise, is extremely engaging and in parts quite original.

As with Polygon Pictures Ajin series, we have an interesting mix of realistic and large-eyed anime characters, both male and female. The frequency with which the characters are encased in their uniquely designed helmets and suits makes character differentiation difficult at times; this causes some confusion. In Blame! however character movement is more fluid and realistic them in Ajin, and we get see these characters from many different angles and in many different and occasionally stunning environments.

Visually, the clothing, weapons, technology, attacking ground-hugging robots, and spacious sets prove constantly interesting, even in the slower parts of the film. Action scenes are frequent, frantic, and make good use of the varied physical environments the characters travel through in their quests for food and technology.

Is there significant character development,? Not really; characters have little if any backstory. Whereas in Ajin we had the conflict between humans and mutant humans as the core, in Blame! we have the another humans versus machine tale, and it isn't that unique.

But the artwork and movement are excellent with unique visuals and more than enough action to overshadow the familiar story. Recommended.

Review copyright (c) 2017 by Dennis D. McDonald

Lu Chuan's CHRONICLES OF THE GHOSTLY TRIBE

Lu Chuan's CHRONICLES OF THE GHOSTLY TRIBE

Ron Clements & John Musker's MOANA

Ron Clements & John Musker's MOANA