Dennis D. McDonald (ddmcd@outlook.com) is an independent consultant located in Alexandria Virginia. His services and capabilities are described here. Application areas include project, program, and data management; market assessment, digital strategy, and program planning; change and content management; social media; and, technology adoption. Follow him on Google+. He also publishes on CTOvision.com and aNewDomain.

My Top Ten Blog Posts from 2013

My Top Ten Blog Posts from 2013

By Dennis D. McDonald

Top Ten Most Popular Posts in 2013

According to Google Analytics, these were my most popular posts in 2013; lots of old ones here:

  1. Cookies, Imrworldwide, and Nielsen Netratings: What’s the Connection? 2007
  2. A Short Definition of “Strategic Planning” 2007
  3. First Impressions: Vudu’s “Vudu to Go” Beta Software 2013
  4. What’s the Difference Between Innovation and Creativity? 2007
  5. Proposed Definition for “Expertise Management Systems” 2006
  6. How To Develop a Business-Aligned Social Media & Social Networking Strategy 2007
  7. Apple’s Product Design Philosophy 2013
  8. What the Heck is “Social DRM”? 2008
  9. Watching My First VUDU Movie 2012
  10. Comcast   Must Die 2013

As usual, I’m a bit surprised at the inclusion of the older posts in this list which is partly testament to the importance of Google Search and partly to the specialized nature of my project management focus.

Most Frequent Words in Titles of 2013 Articles

Here is a Wordle diagram displaying the relative frequency of the terms in all the titles of my 2013 posts; this is followed by the actual list of blog posts from 2013:

Wordle Diagram of Title Word Frequency, 2013 Posts

All of My 2013 Blog Posts

Here are the titles and links to all the “Managing Technology” posts I made during 2013:

Title Links to 2013’s “Managing Technology” Posts

© 2014 by Dennis D. McDonald

Data Standardization Scores and Changing the DATA Act

Data Standardization Scores and Changing the DATA Act

Fixing the NSA: Getting Real About What Really Matters

Fixing the NSA: Getting Real About What Really Matters