Dennis D. McDonald (ddmcd@ddmcd.com) consults from Alexandria Virginia. His services include writing & research, proposal development, and project management. Follow him on Google+. He publishes on CTOvision.com and aNewDomain and volunteers with the Alexandria Film Festival. He is also on Linkedin. To subscribe to emailed updates about additions to this web site click here.

Four Tips For Making a Follow Up Meeting More Successful than the First

Four Tips For Making a Follow Up Meeting More Successful than the First

By Dennis D. McDonald

What if you had a disastrous first meeting with an important person from another organization but now want to have a follow up meeting to repair the damage?

Here are some tips, based on much experience managing and attending meetings, on how you can increase the likelihood this second meeting will be more successful than the first.

  1. Make clear the objectives of this  meeting. Is this a progress report on what has been accomplished since the first? If so, make sure that everyone understands the basis for such a progress report. Will you be reporting against specific measurable objectives? Will you need to gather and analyze data before the meeting in order to objectively assess this progress? Make sure in planing this meeting that you leave enough time for such activities to be carried out. 
  2. Make sure all stakeholders and meeting participants receive a copy in advance of your proposed agenda and that all have an opportunity to comment on the agenda and have the time and resources to do any work associated with what they will be discussing or reporting on the meeting. You want to avoid the appearance (or actuality) of not being prepared when it comes time for you to speak or otherwise participate. Preparation is essential and knowing what you have to prepare for is critical. Being unprepared can lead to disappointment. 
  3. Make sure that the deliberations of the meeting are public so as to minimize any confusion and misunderstanding on the part of the press or stakeholders. The last thing you want is for people to be confused about your performance or what they are supposed to be doing. Transparency about what transpires at the meeting will help to address this. 
  4. Make sure that minutes are kept, distributed, edited, and agreed upon. Again, minimizing uncertainty and confusion are key to successful follow on work. 

If you follow these four simple rules, you will significantly increase the value of your meeting and the likelihood of its success!

Copyright (c) 2018 by Dennis D. McDonald

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