Dennis D. McDonald (ddmcd@outlook.com) is an independent consultant located in Alexandria Virginia. His services and capabilities are described here. Application areas include project, program, and data management; market assessment, digital strategy, and program planning; change and content management; social media; and, technology adoption. Follow him on Google+. He also publishes on CTOvision.com and aNewDomain.

The Hughes Brothers' THE BOOK OF ELI

The Hughes Brothers' THE BOOK OF ELI

Review by Dennis D. McDonald

This film breathes life (of sorts) into the post-apocalyptic-road-warrior genre. Denzel Washington is one seriously cool dude as he slashes his way West on foot through a blasted landscape with his secret personal cargo. 

The religious elements didn’t bother me. What the heck, I thought, that’s as good a theme as you can find: the preservation of the printed Word in a Godless world.

In this case, preservation occurs at the hand of samurai whose skills at lopping off heads when the going gets tough is the stuff of legend. Plus, it’s a beautiful film to look at. I didn’t think I’d ever say that about a film that adopts the washed-out gray-and-umber-tones of so many other contemporary films, but in the hands of cinematographer Don Burgess and what must have been an exhausting post-production digital color correction process, the world that emerges is one of stark beauty. (I say that just having seen Walkabout which generates a similar visceral visual impression but in a completely different full-color way.)

It’s a great cast all around. I even enjoyed watching Mila Kunis fade into the sunset at the end as she goes forth channeling Denzel Washington’s peculiar balletic high-center-of-gravity walk. Plus, the reference to Johnny Cash is really funny. All around, this is a fun film.

Review copyright (c) 2010 by Dennis D. McDonald

Fumihiko Sori's VEXILLE

Fumihiko Sori's VEXILLE

Duncan Jones' MOON