All in Strategy

The Tip of the Spear: Connecting Big Data Project Management with Enterprise Data Strategy

“If data analysis is Big Data’s “tip of the spear” when it comes to delivering data-dependent value to customers or clients, we also must address how that spear is shaped, sharpened, aimed, and thrown – and, of course, whether or not it hits its intended target. We also want the processes associated with throwing that spear to be both effective and efficient.”

The Commerce Data Advisory Council's 2nd Meeting: Storytelling, Staff Recruiting, and Complex Processes

There’s an understanding represented by this group that the data resources being stewarded by Commerce programs both reflect and are critical inputs to U.S. technical and industrial competitiveness. Hopefully this group will be able to facilitate an exchange of useful “lessons learned” and resources across the varied Commerce programs.

Managing Data-Intensive Programs and Projects: Selected Articles

I’ve created this special compendium of posts that are relevant to planning and managing data related programs and projects. There are four groups:

Using Internet Related Economic Development Goals to Drive Open Data Strategy

While there may be significant capacity issues related to Internet and data access in developing countries, it’s impossible to ignore the disruptive and competitive landscape changes the growing Internet use offers wherever existing industries are adopting — or are being threatened by — web based developments. It make sense for at least some of open data program planning to reflect those realities.

How Important Is ‘Total Cost of Standardization’ to the DATA Act?

Last week I attended a meeting in DC sponsored by the Data Transparency Coalition, PwC, and Intel. Representatives of the Federal agencies likely to manage implementation of the evolving DATA Act presented their thoughts on implementing the Act’s requirements for standardizing and reporting on Federal financial data.
In “IT governance is killing innovation” Andrew Horne and Brian Foster argue that IT project selection needs to move beyond traditional capital investment based ROI measures. The authors think it is more appropriate to take into account project support for critical business capabilities and that such a focus will be much more supportive of innovation.