All in Data Access

While a central program management operation can define detailed technical requirements, technical approaches, and management tools, implementation work needs to be occurring locally – while the “train is still running.” How this overall governance process is managed will determine how long DATA Act implementation takes, how much it costs, and whether or not it is successful.

Data Standardization Scores and Changing the DATA Act

The basic ideas behind the DATA Act’s focus on financial data standardization makes such eminently good sense that efforts to weaken such standardization should be carefully and openly assessed. Fundamentally, data standardization if managed well can reduce costs, improve data manageability, reduce errors, and improve communication. Implementing data standards can also improve how date transparency efforts are supported as long as the people who operate the underlying systems want to be more transparent.

Recommendations for Collaborative Management of Government Data Standardization Projects

Standardizing how the U.S. government collects, manages, and publishes budget and expenditure data, as required by the DATA Act currently before the U.S. Congress, is an example of a long-term and complex project. It will be require careful planning, management, and sufficient resources to be successful.

How Important Is ‘Total Cost of Standardization’ to the DATA Act?

Last week I attended a meeting in DC sponsored by the Data Transparency Coalition, PwC, and Intel. Representatives of the Federal agencies likely to manage implementation of the evolving DATA Act presented their thoughts on implementing the Act’s requirements for standardizing and reporting on Federal financial data.

The Changing Culture of Big Data Management

In some ways managing “big data” tools and processes is no different than figuring out how to manage any other type of technological innovation. The technology is introduced, experts emerge and help control and shape evolving practical applications, and management eventually figures out what is worth keeping and what can be discarded.